15 October 2002

Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) announced it received EPA certification for its 12.7 and 14.0 liter Series 60 on-highway engines. The Series 60 engine is certified to the 2004 emission standard of 2.5 g/hp-hr NOx + NMHC (DDC and other signees of the EPA consent decrees made a commitment to meet the 2004 standards starting this October).

The new Series 60 engines are equipped with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and do not require an aftertreatment device of any kind. The Series 60 with EGR features a new low profile gear train and other lighter-weight components to offset the weight increase of the EGR components. The EGR Series 60 engine weighs 2,585 pounds, which is 65 pounds less than the non-EGR version.

In addition, two different families of the Series 50 urban bus engines have received emission certification, said DDC. Series 50 engines are equipped with EGR and oxidation catalysts for meeting the 0.05 g/bhp-hr PM standard (highway engines meet a 0.1 g PM standard). DDC also said it submitted a certification application for a Series 50 urban bus engine equipped with a diesel particulate filter. This engine will be certified to the 2007 PM standard of 0.01 g/bhp-hr. Engines certified to the 0.01 g PM standard are already required in certain urban bus applications in California.

DDC emphasized that the Series 60 engine with EGR requires no changes in maintenance procedures and recommended oil change intervals remain as they were. With eight million miles of testing to date, the wear rates of piston rings and cylinder liners of the EGR Series 60 engines were found to be reduced compared to previous engines without EGR. Cylinder kit wear has also been reduced which should result in longer life to overhaul than the current Series 60.

There are over 650,000 Series 60 engines in operation and the engine has been the most popular heavy-duty engine in NAFTA for the past eleven years in a row.

Source: Detroit Diesel