9 March 2011

Environment Canada has proposed regulations that would align Canadian emission standards for off-road compression ignition engines with the US Tier 4 requirements. The proposal was published in February in the Canada Gazette, Part I.

The proposed “Regulations Amending the Off-Road Compression-Ignition Engine Emission Regulations” would align Canadian emission standards with those of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). The US EPA introduced interim Tier 4 and Tier 4 emission standards in 2004 and began phasing-in these standards for the 2008 to 2015 model years and beyond.

The new Canadian emission standards would apply to diesel engines of 2012 and later model years that are manufactured on, or after, the coming into force date of the proposed Amendments. The proposed Amendments apply to off-road diesel engines such as those found in construction, and in some mining, farming and forestry machines. This includes tractors, excavators, log skidders and bulldozers. Stationary engines would continue to be exempt from the emission requirements.

The proposed Amendments include new emissions standards; installation instructions, maintenance manuals and procedures; labelling requirements; updates to the transition engine provisions; requirements for engines used in transportation refrigeration units; requirements for stationary engines; and other miscellaneous changes to improve the clarity of the Regulations.

The proposed Amendments would incorporate the U.S. EPA’s steady state and transient emission standards for exhaust emissions for 2012 and later model years. The allowable emission levels from individual engines would be significantly reduced from current standards, including reductions of 37% of HC and 50% to 95% reductions of PM emissions. In addition, turbocharged diesel engines, like all engines, can no longer release crankcase emissions, and an evaporative emission standard is introduced for off-road diesel engines fuelled with volatile liquid fuels (i.e. fuels that easily evaporate such as methanol).

While the new emission requirements would become effective from 2012 at the earliest, Environment Canada recently issued an Interim Order that allows the import and sale in Canada of engines that are allowed in the Unites States in the transitional period under the Tier 4 manufacturers flexibility program.

Comments on the proposal should be submitted by April 13th, 2011 to Josée Lavergne of Environment Canada.

Source: Environment Canada