3 September 2003

Caterpillar announced it received 2004 certification by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for its C13 engine, the fourth on-highway truck and bus engine equipped with the ACERT technology. The engine—offered in the 335 to 430 horsepower range—is popular with general freight or line-haul truck fleets that carry goods such as home appliances, building materials, and refrigerated foods, as well as with tanker trucks and vocational-class trucks such as dump trucks, refuse haulers and cement mixers.

Earlier this year, the Caterpillar C9 and C7 engines were certified for use in on-highway trucks, school buses and transit buses. The C15 engine, used in heavy-duty on-highway trucks and offered in the 435 to 550 horsepower range, was certified in March.

The full line of ACERT engines includes C7, C9, C11, C13, and C15 models. Emissions in ACERT engines are controlled through a combination of technologies, including engine electronics, fuel injection systems, combustion technology, and exhaust gas aftertreatment. While the details have not been disclosed by Caterpillar, it is believed that NOx is controlled through such means as injection rate shaping, multiple injections, and internal EGR, while PM is controlled by a diesel oxidation catalyst. ACERT engines do not use cooled EGR, which is the prime NOx control strategy in 2004-compliant engines from other manufacturers.

Source: Caterpillar