20 April 2006

Global powertrain supplier BorgWarner and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have announced a partnership to develop advanced air management technologies that will enable the automotive and trucking industries to utilize EPA’s Clean Diesel Combustion (CDC), as well as Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) gasoline combustion technologies.

The partnership will evaluate and determine the commercial viability of newly advanced turbochargers, air management, and sensors for use with diesel and high efficiency gasoline engines. The cooperation will start with an evaluation of the technical and market potential of advanced turbocharger technologies designed to preserve and extend the diesel engine’s efficiency, as these engines achieve the next generation of diesel emission requirements.

The CDC concept is a combination of several technologies, including high rate exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), advanced fuel injection system, air management/turbocharging systems, and an improved combustion system. The CDC technology requires more advanced air-boosting systems than are used in today’s diesel.

The EPA has been developing CDC diesel engines capable of meeting the Tier 2 light-duty and the 2010 heavy-duty NOx emission standards without NOx aftertreatment. The CDC development has been conducted with several industrial partners, including FEV, International, and Ford.

Source: BorgWarner | EPA